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Not your mother’s Granola

Spending some time tonight with a new cook book, well new to me; it is called “Science in the Kitchen.” I have a second edition which was published in 1904 I think. I’m trying to find some new and exciting ideas for dishes to serve to vegetarians! Of course it is uncommon to abstain from meet during the 19th and early 20th centuries, but some of my guests don’t eat meat so I must find ways to please them.

Cook Book focusing on cooking without meat. Published 1904

Cook Book focusing on cooking without meat. Published 1904

This cook book came out of the wellness movement that was started in Battle Creek, Michigan circa 1880. It was written by Mrs. Ella Eaton Kellogg who for more than 10 years organized the cooking school and meals served to the hundreds of ‘inmates’ at the health sanatorium in Battle Creek. Preserving and promoting health through the proper diet and foods that could be completely digested were primary goals of Mrs. Kellogg and her meals did not include any kind of meat or animal flesh.

Legumes

An important chapter in the book all about Legumes. I do love the graphics!

I’m narrowing in on some dinner options. Black bean soup, squash a la Parmesan which are good recipes I already make. From the cook book I am considering, bean patties, marbled beans, bean and lentil patties, dried corn, crisps, sweet potatoes baked, parsnips and potatoes, mashed split peas. The cook book also has lots of recipes for entrees made with Protose and Granose and Granola; all of which were manufactured foods one purchase through the Sanitarium Food Co. in Battle Creek, Michigan. They were made of nut and grain products.

Protose is a ingredient used is these dishes. It is a manufactured food available from the Sanatorium Food Co. in Battle Creek, Michigan. They also sold Granose and Granola.

Protose is a ingredient used is these dishes. It is a manufactured food available from the Sanatorium Food Co. in Battle Creek, Michigan. They also sold Granose and Granola.

It is a great book to read and it certainly illustrates an interesting health food movement that we have long forgotten. It is the first time I have ever seen the word Granola in an historic cook book and how interesting that is a manufactured food you have to ‘send away for’ all the way to the sanatorium in Battle Creek, Michigan.

The short story is from the book and certainly states the bias of the book and even wags a finger at one of my favorites, mince pie!

Woman (to tramp) – “I can give you some cold buckwheat cakes and a piece of mince pie.”
Tramp – (frightened) “What ye say”
Woman – “Cold buckwheat cakes and mince pie.”
Tramp – (heroically ) “ Throw in a small bottle of pepsin, Madam and I’ll take the chances.”

Canning

The book also includes canning instructions. Great stuff!

Science in the Kitchen also bemoans the custom of serving jams, preserves and pickles. Here is a tray of those very things, apple butter, apricot jam, asparagus pickle, rummage pickle, euchered plums, butter and cream.

Science in the Kitchen also bemoans the custom of serving jams, preserves and pickles. Here is a tray of those very things, apple butter, apricot jam, asparagus pickle, rummage pickle, euchered plums, butter and cream.

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  1. Great post Susan! You’re doing just fine!

  2. Sadie says:

    Like any tramp would be wary of mince pie! Health nut hogwash!

    • Health nut hogwash!!! I love it. There are actually several references in that book about the evil mince pie and she also waves her hand and dismisses pickles and salt meat.I wonder if this is an early sign of exclusivity in food, i.e. the best food is for the best people.And then I have to wonder what exactly was the Protose she speaks so highly of?
      anyway back to work….. going to go get some ice from the yard and put in the cold room on this warm day.

  3. Peggy mohr says:

    Very interesting. The last picture looks so yummy.

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